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    Spousal support is being determined now by new guidelines from Justice Canada. The bureaucrats' cookie-cutter formula calls for virtual equalization of incomes, irrespective of the spouse's needs (the previous criteria). Why doesn't someone challenge this insipid procedure and go back to a needs-based system? No wonder the spouses try to duck out!
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    Depends on which duck you're trying to avoid, and which cookie-cutter. Say
    the payer does not have custody of the child (ren), was residing together in a lengthy
    relationship and mom was largely dependant on his income to help raise their family. In
    such cases the law was developed well before the new advisory Spousal Support
    Guidelines. Such mothers will require as much as between 50-60 cents of every after-tax
    dollar earned between them. If dad earns a lot more, then it would be unfair to leave him
    with even 50 cents of earned income monthly, since between spousal and child support
    the custodial parent has more mouths to feed, clothe and shelter. Similarly, even without
    dependant kids, if the wife sacrificed most of her working life, raising the family so that
    dad could build his income; then the courts will still often equalize incomes, with or
    without the guidelines. But sometimes the guidelines go too far and are too generous,
    especially since they often fail to consider the payer's need and child-related costs.
    Conversely, if it's a short marriage with no kids, the guidelines do not usually
    recommend much, if any spousal support. The Spousal Guidelines are not law. They are
    merely advisory and are quite often either ignored or downplayed by the courts. You best
    bet for a fair result is still a damn good lawyer.

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